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Joey Ackerman profile

Joey Ackerman, LCSW-R

Message from Joey

Joey Ackerman, LCSW-R is a psychotherapist specializing in Cognitive Behavioral and Psychodynamically Oriented Therapy. Her work is focused on creating client-centered goals that are collaborative, constructive, and aligned with the client’s overall sense of well-being. Joey works with a broad array of young adults, professionals, and creatives providing a safe space for treatment. Her therapeutic approach addresses various clinical issues such as depression, anxiety, trauma, attachment issues, bereavement, relational issues, OCD, and various phobias. Joey graduated from the University of Massachusetts with a B.A. and received her MSW from the Silver School of Social Work at New York University. She has also completed Post Master Trainings in Mindfulness, Eating Disorder Treatment, Motivational Interviewing, DBT, CBT, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and Suicidality in Children and Adolescents.

About Joey's practice

Availability

Availability

Weekday mornings and afternoons

Fee

Fee

$$$

Sliding scale

Style

Style

Directive

Reflective

Method

Method

In-person available: Yes

Virtual available: Yes

Expertise

Expertise

Life Transitions

Young Adulthood

Women's Obstacles

Eating Patterns or Eating Disorders

Mood

Imposter Syndrome

Career-Related Stress

Anxiety

Insurance

Insurance

Out of network providers

State

State

NY + 1 more

Why state matters

Background
Profile

Get to Know Joey

If I have never been to therapy before, what should I expect? How do I know if I should go, and how do I start?

If you have never been to therapy before, but would like to better understand your emotions, behavioral patterns, and various relationships, then I think that therapy is worth exploring. For most people, there can be an acute stressor that gets them in the door. If that is the case, then that is where we will start and we will try to better understand how you got there and how to adequately confront the obstacles in your life. This may include reframing, building more awareness and mindfulness into your life, and challenging cognitive distortions that are getting in your way.

Is there ever a time when you would encourage me to leave or graduate? Or how do I know when it's time to end or move on, or time to stay and explore more?

In order for there to be valuable growth, therapy needs to be constructive and engaging. I think the timeline for most people can vary depending on their needs, desire to do deep work, and level of engagement. I respect that some people want to get into the weeds of things while others would like to add some new skills to their toolbox and keep going. This is always an open discussion with me and my clients. Therapy can only work if someone is fully engaged- I find it important to check-in with my clients to assess what is working and to gauge the level of frequency that is needed. I think it's valuable for clients to have a good association with therapy and to feel as if it is a place that they can always return to when they need it. Over the years I've had clients that have upped their visits to twice a week and to then later down the road have check-in's every few months. I think frequency can be fluid based on the client's needs and how they are functioning during certain times in their lives.

What is unique about the work you do, or how have you found your work to be different than your colleagues'?

Something that I strive for in my work is to make people feel safe, understood, seen, and comfortable. I find that there are sessions, where I may talk more than others depending on what the needs of a client are and what useful feedback or insights I can provide at that time. I think the relationship with a therapist and their client is so special and it takes a lot of trust and courage for a person to open up intimately with a clinician. With the understanding that it can be difficult for so many people, I try to maintain a balance of being engaging and human while preserving therapeutic boundaries during the sessions.