5 min read

·

Ryan Ward

What is Humanistic Therapy?

Humanistic Therapy focuses on the individual’s inner world, including their thoughts and feelings. The theory behind humanistic therapy emphasizes that people are born with certain innate needs and desires, such as belonging, self-esteem or personal growth. However, it also recognizes that these needs may not always be met by society or other people in our lives. Goals of humanistic therapy include self-actualization and self-awareness, where patients can become more aware of their problems and focus on personal growth more than finding solutions to them.
What is Humanistic Therapy?

What is humanistic therapy and psychology?

Humanistic therapy stems from humanistic psychology, which focuses on the individual as opposed to the environment in which they live, and emphasizes the importance of personal growth. The humanistic approach developed in response to limitations of Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic theory and B.F. Skinner's behaviorism, which were seen by many psychologists as focused too heavily on behavioral conditioning rather than on understanding how people think or feel about their experiences. Humanistic psychologists believe that people are inherently good and that inherent goodness will eventually surface as a person matures psychologically; this belief contrasts with Freud's emphasis on childhood development being critical for personality formation because he believed most personality traits developed before adulthood could not be changed significantly later in life (Barnes).

Humanistic therapy is a type of therapy that helps solve problems by focusing on personal growth

Humanistic therapy is a type of psychotherapy that focuses on helping people solve problems by looking at the individual as a whole and by focusing on personal growth. The theory behind humanistic therapy is that each person has an innate goodness, and this innate goodness will eventually surface as they mature psychologically.

Humanistic therapists help their clients gain insight into themselves, their values, and how they interact with others. This helps them develop self-esteem and better relationships with others—including friends, family members, coworkers or classmates. They also learn how to deal with stress in healthy ways so it doesn't build up over time until it becomes overwhelming.

What is the goal of humanistic therapy?

Goals of humanistic therapy include self-actualization and self-awareness, where patients can become more aware of their problems and focus on personal growth more than finding solutions to them.

Goals of humanistic therapy include self-actualization and self-awareness, where patients can become more aware of their problems and focus on personal growth more than finding solutions to them

A major focus of humanistic therapy is the process of self-actualization, which is the continuous growth and fulfillment of one's potential. This can be achieved through mindfulness and self-awareness. Self-awareness is a lifelong process that involves being aware of your thoughts, feelings and actions. You might ask yourself questions like: "What do I really want?" or "How can I improve my life?". It's an ongoing process rather than something that happens overnight.

The ultimate goal of humanistic therapy is to help you gain a greater understanding of yourself so that you can improve your mental health naturally without having to take medication or seek professional treatment from a therapist every week.[1]

What is humanistic psychology?

Humanistic psychology is a psychological approach that rose to prominence in the mid-20th century in answer to the limitations of Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic theory and B.F. Skinner's behaviorism. The humanistic perspective sees people as an active agent, who possesses free will and chooses how they want to behave. In addition, it emphasizes that humans have the ability to change their behaviors if they so choose, which gives them control over their lives and future experiences.

In contrast with other psychological theories at the time, humanistic psychology focuses on positive aspects of growth and change for individuals rather than focusing on pathology or negative characteristics. It encourages therapists to be empathic toward their clients by understanding what motivated their choices instead of judging those choices based on societal norms.

Humanistic psychologists believe that people are inherently good and that inherent goodness will eventually surface as a person matures psychologically.

Humanism is based on the belief that humans are inherently good and that we can be happy if we allow our basic goodness to emerge. In other words, humanistic therapists believe that it is possible for all of us to become fully functioning adults who achieve a healthy balance between our own needs and those of others.

What are the principles of humanistic psychology?

Humanistic therapists believe that an individual’s motivation is affected by their desire to develop themselves fully and achieve their greatest potential. In other words, humans are rational beings and have reason as the main motivation for their actions. They can use free will to choose among alternatives, but they usually choose to do what gives them pleasure or avoids pain.

Humans are rational beings and have reason as the main motivation for their actions

Humans are rational beings. Rationality is important in the study of human behavior because humans have the ability to make choices and decisions that result in actions. When looking at a person’s actions, it is important to understand their motivation behind those actions. It would be difficult to understand why someone did something if you did not know what they were thinking when they performed that action. In order for an individual’s thoughts and feelings to make sense, you must consider them within the context of rationality and reasonableness.

Humans can use free will to choose among alternatives, but they usually choose to do what gives them pleasure or avoids pain.

One of the main differences between the humanistic and the psychoanalytic approaches to therapy is that the humanistic approach believes people are rational beings who know what they are doing and why they are doing it. According to Maslow, humans can use free will to choose among alternatives, but they usually choose to do what gives them pleasure or avoids pain.

This view may seem self-evident today, as we live in a culture that values personal freedom and individuality. But back in Freud's time (and even today), many people thought of themselves as victims of unconscious forces that were beyond their control—forces like sex drive or "id." Humans were seen as being driven by these forces rather than choosing how they would behave; thus, any behavior could be explained by reference to these drives.

While humanistic approaches have altered since their inception, they remain focused on issues relating to personal growth and emotional well-being, striving for individuals to reach their potential and find meaning in life

While humanistic approaches have altered since their inception, they remain focused on issues relating to personal growth and emotional well-being, striving for individuals to reach their potential and find meaning in life. This approach takes into account the negative impact of social forces on an individual's ability to fully develop. Thus, humanistic therapy aims to help clients gain awareness of their potential as well as appreciate the value of self-actualization.

Is humanistic therapy for you?

Humanistic Therapy focuses on the individual’s inner world, including their thoughts and feelings. The theory behind humanistic therapy emphasizes that people are born with certain innate needs and desires, such as belonging, self-esteem or personal growth. However, it also recognizes that these needs may not always be met by society or other people in our lives. This can leave us feeling isolated or misunderstood by others due to differences between ourselves and them (including race ethnicity gender etc). If these beliefs resonate with you, a therapist trained in this type of therapy can help you explore your feelings about yourself and others. Click here to get matched with a therapist who can help you explore humanistic therapy in your own journey to healing.

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About the author

Ryan is the Business Development Lead at MyWellbeing. At MyWellbeing, he helps providers get matched with clients through their unique matchmaking directory. Prior to MyWellbeing, he was the founder of Kontess, an edtech solution for universities, which was acquired in 2021. He has worked with small businesses and startups alike to help them increase revenue and reach more potential customers through the use of sales and marketing through his agency, Real Recurring Revenue.

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